Oxford Composites using Photomerge

Off on an assignment the other week, I was desperate to fit beautiful large Oxford scenes onto a single image. So I decided to do some seriously large composites using the photomerge tool in Photoshop CS5…

Photomerge (File – Automate – Photomerge) is lovely and easy to use. You just pick the photos you want to merge, choose how you want them to blend (I usually use it on auto or somtimes use ‘perspective’), hit okay, and away it goes! I guess the only drawback is that if your files are large – or you’re merging a lot of files together – you have to leave your computer churning through them for quite some time (I think my processor and RAM is about average or less, so not everyone will have the same problem!). And also make sure that you’ve photographed lots of images of the scene you want to photograph – and more! The biggest mistake I made is forgetting an edge or a bit of sky in the corner, therefore the images became wider at the bottom than they were at the top, meaning I had to crop them in tighter than I had originally wanted.

Radcliffe Camera v2 Crop

The Radcliffe Camera. The perspective is a little peculiar on this one, but I still like it :) It’s made from about 20 images, and, before I reduced it, the file was 2.5m x 2.8m wide and 1.2GB in size!!!!

Oxford Skyline Small

This is an 8 image composite of the view from Carfax Tower. You can go to the top for a very reasonable price and it’s beautiful.

Ashmolean composite

The Ashmolean at dusk. Whilst this looks like an HDR attempt, the two photos that make up this image were both shot with the same exposure; all I did was mess around with the curves and add a little clarity (testimony to the brilliance of the 5D mark iii!).

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Oxford Composites using Photomerge

Off on an assignment the other week, I was desperate to fit beautiful large Oxford scenes onto a single image. So I decided to do some seriously large composites using the photomerge tool in Photoshop CS5…

Photomerge (File – Automate – Photomerge) is lovely and easy to use. You just pick the photos you want to merge, choose how you want them to blend (I usually use it on auto or somtimes use ‘perspective’), hit okay, and away it goes! I guess the only drawback is that if your files are large – or you’re merging a lot of files together – you have to leave your computer churning through them for quite some time (I think my processor and RAM is about average or less, so not everyone will have the same problem!). And also make sure that you’ve photographed lots of images of the scene you want to photograph – and more! The biggest mistake I made is forgetting an edge or a bit of sky in the corner, therefore the images became wider at the bottom than they were at the top, meaning I had to crop them in tighter than I had originally wanted.

Radcliffe Camera v2 Crop

The Radcliffe Camera. The perspective is a little peculiar on this one, but I still like it :) It’s made from about 20 images, and, before I reduced it, the file was 2.5m x 2.8m wide and 1.2GB in size!!!!

Oxford Skyline Small

This is an 8 image composite of the view from Carfax Tower. You can go to the top for a very reasonable price and it’s beautiful.

Ashmolean composite

The Ashmolean at dusk. Whilst this looks like an HDR attempt, the two photos that make up this image were both shot with the same exposure; all I did was mess around with the curves and add a little clarity (testimony to the brilliance of the 5D mark iii!).

One thought on “Oxford Composites using Photomerge

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